Traditional scientific journal publications require expensive subscriptions for access, causing accessibility to be reduced for those unaffiliated with universities. Even university libraries, which generally provide journal access to students and faculty, struggle to afford subscriptions. Lack of access to research is prevalent in the developing world, contributing to research inequality by keeping scholars away from the forefront of their fields. 

Open access (OA) is a growing trend where research is released online for free to everyone. Many variations of OA exist, including OA journals and repositories. Journals can also have different policies surrounding OA, including green and gold open access. Here are how the elements of the OA ecosystem differ.

Research articles can be provided for OA both as preprints (before peer review) and postprints (after peer review). When preprints are shared via OA, they are usually archived in an OA repository by the author. Institutional repositories are run through universities to maintain their own authors’ work. Other repositories such as arXiv accept submissions from anybody, and they usually focus on specific academic fields. Open access repositories can be viewed and searched online by anybody. Papers shared via open access can receive comments from community members, and this process can replace a traditional peer review. Uploaded work can often be modified, and it can also carry a unique doi and be cited. Sharing work through subject-specific OA repositories is growing, and arXiv currently maintains about two million scholarly articles.

Authors share preprints for OA through repositories before getting involved with journal publications. Those hoping to get peer reviewed and published by a journal should know that journals have conflicting policies surrounding preprint sharing. Some journals permit preprints to be publicly shared, others strictly prohibit it. Others may restrict the repositories to which one can publish to institutional repositories, for example. Understanding the policies of journals to which one hopes to submit their work before sharing preprints is important.

Green OA refers to the aforementioned process where authors share papers themselves through a repository. Some journals themselves have OA policies. They peer review and publish works, and their published journal volumes are then made available for free to the public. This process is known as Gold OA. Journals providing Gold OA may make all articles publicly available for free, or they may default to being subscription-based with an option for authors to make their individual contributions open access for a fee (hybrid model). Gold OA journals are usually funded by fees applied to authors, but universities, libraries, or other institutions can cover the costs.

Jinso accepts scholarly work from any field and shares all content for free, so it functions more similarly to Green OA than Gold OA. The platform also provides some benefits usually reserved for Gold OA, including ensuring peer review is conducted on each article by a community expert. Publishing work through Jinso is easy to use and completely free for users.


GitHub is a popular platform used by computer scientists to manage their collaborative projects, but a similar program does not exist for academic work. There is no standard platform to create work, connect with others, and share work in one place. Most platforms only fall into one or two of these categories.The Jinso collaboration tool is a better way for groups to work on projects. By bringing the entire academic collaboration process onto one tool, it simplifies workflows and communication.The first steps for using the Jinso platform are:

Create an account
Create your first group

Once a user builds a network, they can create new Groups that consist of their network members. By default, the creator of a group is the admin. The most common Group is a research group, but the platform can manage several other types of academic projects. Platform users can create study groups for sharing course materials or groups of club members for extracurricular work.The admin of the Group has the ability to add new members at any time.
Admins are also responsible for creating Projects within Groups.

A Project for a research group is usually a research paper, but Projects can also be other forms of documents that could benefit from discussion and revisions. Examples include study guides, business plans, articles, and essays. Each Group can have an unlimited number of Projects within it, and all Projects within a Group are shared among the same members. 

Once a user builds a network, they can create new Groups that consist of their network members. By default, the creator of a group is the admin. The most common Group is a research group, but the platform can manage several other types of academic projects.

Platform users can create study groups for sharing course materials or groups of club members for extracurricular work.The admin of the Group has the ability to add new members at any time. Admins are also responsible for creating Projects within Groups.

A Project for a research group is usually a research paper, but Projects can also be other forms of documents that could benefit from discussion and revisions. Examples include study guides, business plans, articles, and essays. Each Group can have an unlimited number of Projects within it, and all Projects within a Group are shared among the same members. 

Example of Research group
Revisions of the paper

When a new Project is created, an initial revision must be shared. This can either be plain text or a PDF.
The Project will be immediately visible to all Group members with the first revision shown. Group members can comment on the revision with questions or feedback, and others can reply to comments.When another revision of the paper has been completed, the Group admin can add a new revision to the same Project.
The revision will become visible above the prior revision, and it will have a new comment box associated with it. Projects make it simple to keep track of a paper’s entire revision history and discussions at each stage. 

For each revision, Group admins can also create subtasks. Arrows allow Group members to view all of the different subtasks and comment on them individually. Subtasks allow a paper to be analyzed in unique components. For example, a research paper can have a unique subtask for each of its sections, and collaborators can discuss them all separately in the comment boxes. Jinso is a quicker way to collaborate on long-term projects. It makes it easier to connect, share, and manage the development of ideas and papers. You can create a Jinso account and start using the platform today for your research and academic needs at jinso.io.

Traditional scientific journal publications require expensive subscriptions for access, causing accessibility to be reduced for those unaffiliated with universities. Even university libraries, which generally provide journal access to students and faculty, struggle to afford subscriptions. Lack of access to research is prevalent in the developing world, contributing to research inequality by keeping scholars away from the forefront of their fields. 

Open access (OA) is a growing trend where research is released online for free to everyone. Many variations of OA exist, including OA journals and repositories. Journals can also have different policies surrounding OA, including green and gold open access. Here are how the elements of the OA ecosystem differ.

Research articles can be provided for OA both as preprints (before peer review) and postprints (after peer review). When preprints are shared via OA, they are usually archived in an OA repository by the author. Institutional repositories are run through universities to maintain their own authors’ work. Other repositories such as arXiv accept submissions from anybody, and they usually focus on specific academic fields. Open access repositories can be viewed and searched online by anybody. Papers shared via open access can receive comments from community members, and this process can replace a traditional peer review. Uploaded work can often be modified, and it can also carry a unique doi and be cited. Sharing work through subject-specific OA repositories is growing, and arXiv currently maintains about two million scholarly articles.

Authors share preprints for OA through repositories before getting involved with journal publications. Those hoping to get peer reviewed and published by a journal should know that journals have conflicting policies surrounding preprint sharing. Some journals permit preprints to be publicly shared, others strictly prohibit it. Others may restrict the repositories to which one can publish to institutional repositories, for example. Understanding the policies of journals to which one hopes to submit their work before sharing preprints is important.

Green OA refers to the aforementioned process where authors share papers themselves through a repository. Some journals themselves have OA policies. They peer review and publish works, and their published journal volumes are then made available for free to the public. This process is known as Gold OA. Journals providing Gold OA may make all articles publicly available for free, or they may default to being subscription-based with an option for authors to make their individual contributions open access for a fee (hybrid model). Gold OA journals are usually funded by fees applied to authors, but universities, libraries, or other institutions can cover the costs.

Jinso accepts scholarly work from any field and shares all content for free, so it functions more similarly to Green OA than Gold OA. The platform also provides some benefits usually reserved for Gold OA, including ensuring peer review is conducted on each article by a community expert. Publishing work through Jinso is easy to use and completely free for users.


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