Saaim Khan was determined to get involved in research early in high school. After his freshman year, he was inspired by a prior diagnosis to study hearing loss. The resources and advice available to aspiring researchers were slim. After sending around 650 emails to various professors, Khan had found the lab where he would work for the next few years. 

Khan worked alongside Dr. Jeffrey Tseng at the Wayne State School of Medicine in Michigan. Their research focused on computational biology, specifically identifying potential drugs that may alleviate hearing loss. Their computational work analyzed drugs based on their functional properties to understand how they would bind to proteins. Computational biology is computer-based and a precursor to experimental testing in a lab.

Having found his own way into research after many difficulties, Khan wanted to simplify the process for others. “The biggest roadblock I noticed was research accessibility, and I wanted to try to eliminate that as much as possible,” he shared. Working independently at first, Khan developed two online courses instructing people how to conduct computational biology research. His materials are available for free on Udemy. 

Khan realized that his advocacy work would be much more impactful if he was working alongside an organization providing resources and support. He became a coordinator with OneShared.World, an organization working to increase access to research globally. “I started working with them on leveraging their platform to expand [its] reach,” he shared.

OneShared.World has a similar vision to Jinso: making research more accessible to those outside of the traditional academic community. Jinso is a network providing research opportunities for high school students by connecting them to research mentors. The platform allows high school students to get a head start on their academic careers, or provide research advising to high school students who may not ultimately attend university.

At OneShared.World, Khan now coordinates the research and development of a toolkit also focusing on access to computational biology research. “We’re targeting high school students, undergraduate students who may not have any formal research experience, and anybody who wants to investigate something,” he said.

Khan is currently a freshman at Harvard College studying Regenerative and Human Developmental Biology (HDRB). “HDRB is the future of hearing loss therapeutics and a lot of idiopathic conditions,” he thinks. He plans to work with professors researching hearing cell regeneration at Massachusetts Eye and Ear. Khan is also pursuing a secondary in Global Health and Health Policy to integrate his work with knowledge of healthcare systems. 









GitHub is a popular platform used by computer scientists to manage their collaborative projects, but a similar program does not exist for academic work. There is no standard platform to create work, connect with others, and share work in one place. Most platforms only fall into one or two of these categories.The Jinso collaboration tool is a better way for groups to work on projects. By bringing the entire academic collaboration process onto one tool, it simplifies workflows and communication.The first steps for using the Jinso platform are:

Create an account
Create your first group

Once a user builds a network, they can create new Groups that consist of their network members. By default, the creator of a group is the admin. The most common Group is a research group, but the platform can manage several other types of academic projects. Platform users can create study groups for sharing course materials or groups of club members for extracurricular work.The admin of the Group has the ability to add new members at any time.
Admins are also responsible for creating Projects within Groups.

A Project for a research group is usually a research paper, but Projects can also be other forms of documents that could benefit from discussion and revisions. Examples include study guides, business plans, articles, and essays. Each Group can have an unlimited number of Projects within it, and all Projects within a Group are shared among the same members. 

Once a user builds a network, they can create new Groups that consist of their network members. By default, the creator of a group is the admin. The most common Group is a research group, but the platform can manage several other types of academic projects.

Platform users can create study groups for sharing course materials or groups of club members for extracurricular work.The admin of the Group has the ability to add new members at any time. Admins are also responsible for creating Projects within Groups.

A Project for a research group is usually a research paper, but Projects can also be other forms of documents that could benefit from discussion and revisions. Examples include study guides, business plans, articles, and essays. Each Group can have an unlimited number of Projects within it, and all Projects within a Group are shared among the same members. 

Example of Research group
Revisions of the paper

When a new Project is created, an initial revision must be shared. This can either be plain text or a PDF.
The Project will be immediately visible to all Group members with the first revision shown. Group members can comment on the revision with questions or feedback, and others can reply to comments.When another revision of the paper has been completed, the Group admin can add a new revision to the same Project.
The revision will become visible above the prior revision, and it will have a new comment box associated with it. Projects make it simple to keep track of a paper’s entire revision history and discussions at each stage. 

For each revision, Group admins can also create subtasks. Arrows allow Group members to view all of the different subtasks and comment on them individually. Subtasks allow a paper to be analyzed in unique components. For example, a research paper can have a unique subtask for each of its sections, and collaborators can discuss them all separately in the comment boxes. Jinso is a quicker way to collaborate on long-term projects. It makes it easier to connect, share, and manage the development of ideas and papers. You can create a Jinso account and start using the platform today for your research and academic needs at jinso.io.

Saaim Khan was determined to get involved in research early in high school. After his freshman year, he was inspired by a prior diagnosis to study hearing loss. The resources and advice available to aspiring researchers were slim. After sending around 650 emails to various professors, Khan had found the lab where he would work for the next few years. 

Khan worked alongside Dr. Jeffrey Tseng at the Wayne State School of Medicine in Michigan. Their research focused on computational biology, specifically identifying potential drugs that may alleviate hearing loss. Their computational work analyzed drugs based on their functional properties to understand how they would bind to proteins. Computational biology is computer-based and a precursor to experimental testing in a lab.

Having found his own way into research after many difficulties, Khan wanted to simplify the process for others. “The biggest roadblock I noticed was research accessibility, and I wanted to try to eliminate that as much as possible,” he shared. Working independently at first, Khan developed two online courses instructing people how to conduct computational biology research. His materials are available for free on Udemy. 

Khan realized that his advocacy work would be much more impactful if he was working alongside an organization providing resources and support. He became a coordinator with OneShared.World, an organization working to increase access to research globally. “I started working with them on leveraging their platform to expand [its] reach,” he shared.

OneShared.World has a similar vision to Jinso: making research more accessible to those outside of the traditional academic community. Jinso is a network providing research opportunities for high school students by connecting them to research mentors. The platform allows high school students to get a head start on their academic careers, or provide research advising to high school students who may not ultimately attend university.

At OneShared.World, Khan now coordinates the research and development of a toolkit also focusing on access to computational biology research. “We’re targeting high school students, undergraduate students who may not have any formal research experience, and anybody who wants to investigate something,” he said.

Khan is currently a freshman at Harvard College studying Regenerative and Human Developmental Biology (HDRB). “HDRB is the future of hearing loss therapeutics and a lot of idiopathic conditions,” he thinks. He plans to work with professors researching hearing cell regeneration at Massachusetts Eye and Ear. Khan is also pursuing a secondary in Global Health and Health Policy to integrate his work with knowledge of healthcare systems. 









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