Peer review is essential for establishing the credibility of academic research. Successful peer review is necessary for journal publication and to be taken seriously by the research community. The idea makes sense: work is evaluated on its own merits by an accredited source. Blinding is often employed to ensure that a researcher’s reputation and peer reviewer’s identity do not impact the evaluation of research.

In practice, the peer review process is more exclusive than meritocratic. Well-connected, experienced researchers at top institutions know the journal editors and understand what they are looking for. At the highest levels, academic communities are small enough that peer review isn’t anonymous: community members can usually identify the paper authors and peer reviewers from writing style and interests. Stylistic elements of a paper’s topic, structure, and discussion of findings can prevent a paper from passing review, even when strong research methodologies are employed.

For academics left out of journal publication, the main alternative for sharing work is to upload a preprint to an open access repository. The article is not peer reviewed before being shared, and receptive feedback from the community serves as the substitute. The paper will not achieve the same level of credibility as a paper having gone through a blinded peer review process.

Jinso offers the best of both open access and peer review. Papers written in the program are sent to other participants as peer reviewers who evaluate the paper on its merits. Papers are scored on their argument and methodologies with precise standards that remove room for bias, allowing researchers to revise their papers. 

The journal publication ecosystem also contributes to inequality in the research community. If a paper receives a very positive peer review from a less prestigious journal, it is still overshadowed by articles published in more popular journals. Relevant, strong research articles shared in journals with a smaller number of readers are structurally disadvantaged and will receive less downloads and citations.


GitHub is a popular platform used by computer scientists to manage their collaborative projects, but a similar program does not exist for academic work. There is no standard platform to create work, connect with others, and share work in one place. Most platforms only fall into one or two of these categories.The Jinso collaboration tool is a better way for groups to work on projects. By bringing the entire academic collaboration process onto one tool, it simplifies workflows and communication.The first steps for using the Jinso platform are:

Create an account
Create your first group

Once a user builds a network, they can create new Groups that consist of their network members. By default, the creator of a group is the admin. The most common Group is a research group, but the platform can manage several other types of academic projects. Platform users can create study groups for sharing course materials or groups of club members for extracurricular work.The admin of the Group has the ability to add new members at any time.
Admins are also responsible for creating Projects within Groups.

A Project for a research group is usually a research paper, but Projects can also be other forms of documents that could benefit from discussion and revisions. Examples include study guides, business plans, articles, and essays. Each Group can have an unlimited number of Projects within it, and all Projects within a Group are shared among the same members. 

Once a user builds a network, they can create new Groups that consist of their network members. By default, the creator of a group is the admin. The most common Group is a research group, but the platform can manage several other types of academic projects.

Platform users can create study groups for sharing course materials or groups of club members for extracurricular work.The admin of the Group has the ability to add new members at any time. Admins are also responsible for creating Projects within Groups.

A Project for a research group is usually a research paper, but Projects can also be other forms of documents that could benefit from discussion and revisions. Examples include study guides, business plans, articles, and essays. Each Group can have an unlimited number of Projects within it, and all Projects within a Group are shared among the same members. 

Example of Research group
Revisions of the paper

When a new Project is created, an initial revision must be shared. This can either be plain text or a PDF.
The Project will be immediately visible to all Group members with the first revision shown. Group members can comment on the revision with questions or feedback, and others can reply to comments.When another revision of the paper has been completed, the Group admin can add a new revision to the same Project.
The revision will become visible above the prior revision, and it will have a new comment box associated with it. Projects make it simple to keep track of a paper’s entire revision history and discussions at each stage. 

For each revision, Group admins can also create subtasks. Arrows allow Group members to view all of the different subtasks and comment on them individually. Subtasks allow a paper to be analyzed in unique components. For example, a research paper can have a unique subtask for each of its sections, and collaborators can discuss them all separately in the comment boxes. Jinso is a quicker way to collaborate on long-term projects. It makes it easier to connect, share, and manage the development of ideas and papers. You can create a Jinso account and start using the platform today for your research and academic needs at jinso.io.

Peer review is essential for establishing the credibility of academic research. Successful peer review is necessary for journal publication and to be taken seriously by the research community. The idea makes sense: work is evaluated on its own merits by an accredited source. Blinding is often employed to ensure that a researcher’s reputation and peer reviewer’s identity do not impact the evaluation of research.

In practice, the peer review process is more exclusive than meritocratic. Well-connected, experienced researchers at top institutions know the journal editors and understand what they are looking for. At the highest levels, academic communities are small enough that peer review isn’t anonymous: community members can usually identify the paper authors and peer reviewers from writing style and interests. Stylistic elements of a paper’s topic, structure, and discussion of findings can prevent a paper from passing review, even when strong research methodologies are employed.

For academics left out of journal publication, the main alternative for sharing work is to upload a preprint to an open access repository. The article is not peer reviewed before being shared, and receptive feedback from the community serves as the substitute. The paper will not achieve the same level of credibility as a paper having gone through a blinded peer review process.

Jinso offers the best of both open access and peer review. Papers written in the program are sent to other participants as peer reviewers who evaluate the paper on its merits. Papers are scored on their argument and methodologies with precise standards that remove room for bias, allowing researchers to revise their papers. 

The journal publication ecosystem also contributes to inequality in the research community. If a paper receives a very positive peer review from a less prestigious journal, it is still overshadowed by articles published in more popular journals. Relevant, strong research articles shared in journals with a smaller number of readers are structurally disadvantaged and will receive less downloads and citations.


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